Conflicts in the Arab Media: Vision and Critique

5 November 2014. From 18:30 | Workshop | English | IEMed, Barcelona

Although social media is the banner of the revolution, the journalist wants to highlight the “hybrid” nature of the riots, as street protests coexist at all times, on the one hand, and the advance of the revolutionary movement in the network, on the other. Therefore, according to Talaat, both mobile phones and computers, as well as pencils, brushes, paints and banners, have been tools in the service of this movement, which has had Tahrir Square as its center of coordination and information. In this sense, the journalist narrates how the square has become a stage for debate between representatives of most of the 52 parties running in the parliamentary elections and a population without a democratic tradition that has been able to know their ideologies and political programs.

On the other hand, Talaat recalls how the square was also the starting point for the first major feminist mobilization in the country when it recently hosted nearly 15,000 women in a demonstration against the growing violence by soldiers and police. The aim was to publicly express their role in both the revolution and Egyptian society. A “particularly daring” moment, according to Talaat, because it represented “the rebirth of women in society” in the face of military power, which still appeals to the official Women’s Council, chaired at the time by Susan Mubarak.

Lali Sandiumenge, a freelance journalist and expert in cyberactivism in the Arab world, delivers this conference, the third session of the “Mediterranean 2012: scenario of a transition” debate series.

Speakers


Lali Sandiumenge
Moderator

Lali Sandiumenge

Journalist
Sahar Talaat
Speaker

Sahar Talaat

Journalist

Collaboration


Pictures


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